A note on: Soundings #1 with Emma Bennett

The beginning of Soundings couldn't have gone better. Not only because the performance was unique and well attended and went to plan, but because it was also completely idiosyncratic and unexpected for the audience, and enjoyable. Emma and I have known each for a few year now, and been in collective work together, but never performed a duo. The performance itself and the entire preparation period could not have been easier and more fluid. We met up numerous times to make our performance not only responsive to the materials given by the Wellcome Library under the theme of 'Restless Cities' but also to make sure we responded very specifically to the amazing environmental of Camley Street Natural Park.

We knew people's experience of what we did would be defined by the surroundings, and decided in fact to put on a walking tour, one that fused elements of performance and immersive theatre all rooted in something like a slightly alternative version of the contemporary 'landscape' 'cityscape' 'mindfulness' lexicon. Our performance was a mix of improvisation, preparation for this and written text that lay somewhere between poetry and satire.

In the end we had a remarkable audience, those very generously helping us, Harriet Martin, James Wilkes, Kim Staines, bringing together lots of people so that it felt quite a significant event, marching 50 or so people around the small stone clearings and ponds of the park. A strange experience for them, I hope, a great experience for us.

Upcoming: Soundings - a project with Hubbub & Wellcome Library

Soundings is a series of collaborative performances I will be presenting from August 2015 to October 2016, in conjunction with Hubbub and the Wellcome Library. There will be ten editions, each in a different location in and around London, each with a different collaborator.www.stevenjfowler.com/soundings

Soundings

Each edition of Soundings will begin with Wellcome library staff raiding the library's extensive collection to suggest items, including images, manuscripts and books, in response to a title inspired by the Hubbub's research strands and initiated by Hubbub curators. These prompts will form the basis for the public performances of sound poetry, sonic art or conceptual performance, devised each time by myself and my collaborator. Collaborators include Emma Bennett, Dylan Nyoukis, Maja Jantar, Patrick Coyle, Sharon Gal, Tamarin Norwood and James Wilkes, with more to be announced.

Hubbub are the first residents of The Hub at Wellcome Collection, an international team of scientists, humanists, artists, clinicians, public health experts, broadcasters and public engagement professionals. We explore the dynamics of rest, noise, tumult, activity and work, as they operate in mental health, neuroscience, the arts and the everyday. I'm fortunate to be part of this extraordinary enterprise, as a poet and artist in residence, and you can read more about my work with Hubbub here: www.stevenjfowler.com/hubbubor www.hubbubgroup.org 

Soundings #1: August 18th
at Camley Street Natural Park
with Emma Bennett

Time: 1pm – 2pm (12 Camley Street, London N1C 4PW). Free entrance.

www.hubbubgroup.org/soundings

Soundings #2: September 4th 
at Wellcome Collection Late
with Dylan Nyoukis

Time: 19.40 and 21.30 (183 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE). Free Entrance 
www.wellcomecollection.org/events/friday-late-spectacular-hubbub

Soundings #3: November 18th
at St Johns on Bethnal Green

with Maja Jantar

Time: 8pm to 9pm (200 Cambridge Heath Road. London E2 9PA). Free Entrance.
www.stjohnonbethnalgreen.org

the Launch of Bill Griffiths collected poems 2 at Goodenough college

Announcing launch of Bill Griffiths' Collected Poems  (Vol 2)
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Launch of Bill Griffiths Collected Poems Vol 2


Reality Street published Bill Griffiths’ Collected Earlier Poems (1966-80) in 2010. Extending the account through the following decade, a new volume, Collected Poems & Sequences (1981-91), once again edited by Alan Halsey, collects poems and sequences from a prolific period in Bill's life that originally appeared in very small editions. The 426-page volume, publication of which was enabled by subscriptions from 120 supporters, also includes a section of uncollected or previously unpublished poems. The editor provides bibliographical and textual notes.
The book will be launched on Saturday 1st March at Goodenough College, Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB. Selections from Bill's work will be read by poets Ken Edwards, Allen Fisher, Harry Gilonis, Alan Halsey, Mendoza, Geraldine Monk and Robert Sheppard. Copies of both Collected Poems & Sequences (1981-91) and Collected Earlier Poems (1966-80) will be on sale at a reduced price. The event starts at 7.00pm, readings at 7.30.

If you would like to come to the launch please reply to this message or email info@realitystreet.co.uk. The event is free, but you need to book your place in advance.

If you would like to review the new book, please use the same email address to request a review copy, or call 01424 431271.

For fuller information about the book, PLEASE CLICK HERE.

Thanks are due to Steven Fowler and the Enemies project for supporting the launch.

Collected Poems & Sequences (1981-91)
2014, 978-1-874400-65-3,  426pp, price £19 £15 at launch

 

Bill Griffiths
Bill Griffiths was a poet, Anglo-Saxon scholar, book designer, small press publisher, biker, pianist, archivist and social historian. 

His poetry came to prominence in the early 1970s, when he was associated with the small press poetry movement in London.

Later in his career he moved from London to North East England where he reinvigorated the study of the region’s dialect. He died in 2007 at the age of 59.

photo: Robert Cassel

Philip Terry's novel 'Tapestry' reviewed in the Guardian

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/may/28/tapestry-philip-terry-review So happy to see this, Philip Terry is one of the most inventive and brilliant contemporary British poets. 

"By showing a language in flux,tapestry draws you into its world: that of the creation of the Bayeux tapestry (which, as we are reminded in the book by an exasperated narrator, isn't a tapestry at all, but a work of embroidery) by a group of nuns in the late 11th century at a priory in Kent. (The theory that it was commissioned by Bishop Odo, William the Conqueror's half-brother, and stitched in England, very possibly in Kent, has the full endorsement of Professor Wikipedia.)..."